# Slowear News

[...]

06.22.2016

The Fashion Week is a busy time in the city of Milan, full of happening parties and busy schedules. This year, a new event enriched the agenda - the exclusive cocktail party celebrating the A Spotlight on Talents scouting project in collaboration with L’Uomo Vogue On the evening of June 20, the ‘who is who’ of the fashion industry gathered along with our friends and collaborators on the rooftop of la Rinascente in Milan to celebrate the four designers who embraced the challenge to create window displays for the front façade of Italy’s most prestigious department store. In were hosts for the evening Editor in Chief L'Uomo Vogue Ms. Franca Sozzani & President of Slowear Mr. Roberto Compagno. Among speeches and jubilation, the four artists from different disciplines - visual Artist Elena Xausa, designer Mario Milana, Walter Molteni & Luisa Milani from graphic design studio La Tigre and photographer Carmen Mitrotta - were felicitated onstage by the hosts.  The evening developed into a good mix of socializing and entertainment with the unique backdrop of the Cathedral’s towering white spires. As for the food and drinks, they did not fail to impress either with specially chosen delicacies that represented the core of brand Slowear, namely a ‘slow lifestyle’. This awesome party marked the culmination of yet another Slowear & L'uomo Vogue initiative that gave a voice to artistic talent by creating a much needed platform. Here’s hoping for many more editions of this truly significant collaboration.

[...]

06.17.2016

Mario Milana is a talented and successful desiger working between Milan and new York City, where he founded the two branches of his studio. Born and raised in Milan, Mario moved to New York at the age of 23, and this exposed him to multiculturalism which opened his mind and played a key role in defining the person he is today. Now it is only when one travels that a realisation dawns about the richness that surrounds oneself in Milan. His father, an exhibition designer, was a strong influence in moulding him, leaving an imprint of production and functionality on the young Mario. He says that an aspect of Milan that influenced him greatly is its elegance. Design is the lens through which Mario sees the world, and it is inseparable from himself as a person, being a constant thought on his mind. He particularly appreciates the industrial, raw feel to design. A balance of these aspects can be seen in his work. When asked to take part in our project, he could not imagine a better fit to collaborate with since he shares core values with Slowear namely quality, craftsmanship and timelessness. And speaking of timelessness, he explained to us his formula: quality + identity = timelessness. As a designer, Mario aspires to still be relevant. To achieve this, he keeps in mind a lot of variety while always trying to design something different. This, according to him, is the way of becoming iconic.   Mario was introduced to design and fashion in his early years without even knowing it. “Living in Milan you just take it for granted as you are born here”, he said. As a child, he also became familiar with Zanone (the Slowear brand on which his window display focuses), when his mother taught him to appreciate the simplicity and quality this brand and showed him the meaning of a real timeless brand.  About the design and creation of his window displays, they developed very organically since he had pieces in his design collection that could embody the concepts he wanted to express. The endless Fair Play sofa represents the "Timeless" approach of Zanone. Seasons go by but quality standards remain forever. The second window displays the concept of "Slow Living",  because it is not only a fashion choice but also a lifestyle that allows us to maintain our equilibrium in today's world.  To see Mario Milana's window displays, along with the works of the other three artists from the A Spotlight on Talents project, drop by la Rinascente in Milan until June 21.  

[...]

06.16.2016

A childhood spent up on the hills near Venice, which influenced her perception of life and enhanced her power of expression through art, creating a positive and easy attitude. This is basically the background of Berlin-based artist and illustrator Elena Xausa, whose trademarks are the mostly cheerful and funny subjects, the choice of bright and joyful colors, and the ironic meaning behind most of her creations. Elena is the third artist involved in the A Spotlight on Talents project, so today we'd like to focus on her work, which draws inspiration from several visual fields including contemporary art, handcraft, comic books and graphic design, although each drawing or project has its own history and mood.   “I was really thrilled by the chance to design one of the most important store windows in Italy", said Elena. "Then I came to know Slowear and I really appreciated their philosophy: the brand is truly classic, with a strong sense of tradition and quality, but the cuts and the color palette are totally contemporary and fresh.” When the collaboration offer for the Rinascente windows came up, Elena was researching traditional costumes, handcrafted object and masks, and looking for a project to convey all the things she had collected. This seemed to her like the perfect opportunity to create something playful, distinctive and striking by mixing classic and new together, and by working with dynamic mechanisms and big proportions. Her favourite element in the Incotex-themed display is the pair of giant trousers made for the huge moving characters. To take a look at Elena’s work in motion, alongside the three other collaborations across the eight front window displays, visit the front façade of la Rinascente in Milan until the 21st of June 2016 .

[...]

06.15.2016

Photographer Carmen Mitrotta is one of the four artists contributing to the A Spotlight on Talents project in collaboration with L'Uomo Vogue Italia, a set of unique Slowear-themed window displays at la Rinascente, specially conceived on the occasion of Milan Fashion Week. We spoke to her to gain an insight into her life and mind, as well as to learn more about the ideas that sculpted the designs for her displays. When asked about the relationship between herself as a person and as a photographer, Carmen told us how her personal and professional lives are very much in sync and amalgamate into one lifestyle. The only difference is her eye for precision and desire to have everything in order at work, while in her personal space she is more easy going and sometimes even messy. Carmen is particularly concerned about the study of shapes and colours and how they combine into the photo's composition, and she constantly strikes to find the perfect balance between real and virtual. Among her inspirations is one of Itay's most beloved painters of all times, Caravaggio, whom she particularly appreciates for the use of light. Regarding this project and her motivation for committing to it, Carmen mentioned that it was the challenge for her imagination and her instant connection with brand Slowear that made the decision to venture into this collaboration. She is also happy with the beautiful space offered by la Rinascente to display her photographic work. The concept for the display was inspired by the vision of a world where nature and metropolis come together in a new space. Lastly, we asked her about the Slowear brand Montedoro that is a part of her display. She said that she really likes the materials used in the creation of Montedoro's outerwear and jackets. Do not miss to pass by la Rinascente before the 21st of June 2016 to take a look at Carmen’s work alongside the three other collaborations across the eight front window displays.

[...]

06.14.2016

As anticipated in our previous article, the launch of A Spotlight on Talents is scheduled for today and so we had a chat with the artists who created the concepts for the window displays at la Rinascente to learn more about their work and inspirations.  Our first monography focuses on La Tigre, an independent MIlan-based multidisciplinary creative consultancy directed by the designer duo Luisa Milani & Walter Molteni, founded in 2009. Luisa and Walter believe that beauty, functionality & timeless ideas are the true essence of their works at studio La Tigre, and their creations are often influenced by their love for Italian graphic designs from the 50’s & 60’s, based on clean shapes & strong concepts. In taking up our creative challenge in collaboration with L'uomo Vogue, La Tigre felt a strong connection with the Slowear brand philosophy, which, as the duo stated, is in some way very close to the design vision of their studio. As for the specific inspiration behind their window displays,  Luisa and Walter mentioned  the work of the late designer, painter and architect Franco Grignani, author of the iconic Woolmark logo. More specifically, their concept revolves around the idea of representing a rock show without the use of music or musical instruments, expressing the power of music in a graphic, minimal and clean way.   While speaking of Glanshirt - the Slowear brand which was the subject of their work, Walter and Luisa said:   ‘We love Glanshirt's  shirt textures, especially the most eccentric ones, micro-detailed but still elegant'. We truly can't wait to see their concept laid out. In the meantime, check ot the next monographies and don't forget to drop by la Rinascente - starting today and until June 21 - to take a look these amazing installations. A Spotlight on Talents, a project by Slowear & L'Uomo Vogue in collaboration with la Rinascente, Milan, June 14-21, 2016 

[...]

06.08.2016

From 8th to 28th June 2016, the two Slowear stores in Paris (169, Boulevard Saint Germain & 75 Rue Vieille du Temple) will host Olivier Vinot’s exhibition Festina Lente,  with photographs of 1,000 bearded men. Read on to learn more about this humanist photographer as the Slowear Journal chats with him. SJ: Who is ‘Olivier Vinot’ in three words?OV: Contemplative, Idealistic, Photographer. SJ: What are you Passionate about?OV: Sociology, the complexity of humans & their social interaction fascinates me. I love meeting people that are passionate in fields as diverse as possible, I nourish myself with the passions of others. SJ: Mention a few things you will never leave home without.OV: My smartphone! Although I rarely use it to call. I use it for everything, planning, social networking, transportation (subway, Uber, Autolib in Paris), meal delivery, & of course because it allows me to have a camera in my pocket at all times. SJ: Tell us something in the city of Paris which is a big inspiration to you.OV: Paris is a very cosmopolitan city, it allows me to meet many different people. The city is beautiful architecturally, even if as a "Parisian" I do not take the time to look at it. Aesthetics is everywhere, from architectural details to the way women dress. Each district is evolving like a village, with its atmosphere & its people. This allows me to visit these spaces according to what best fits my mood for the day, as they are located conveniently minutes away. SJ: How do you as a person connect with Slowear?OV: There are two acronyms that I often use: K.I.S.S (Keep it so simple) & T.E.A.M (Together Each Achieves More), they are like Mantras to me. This family heritage transmitted from father to son and all the care & attention given to the garments during their production are strong values ​​that are mostly neglected today. This timeless approach with a desire for excellence, as opposed to the common quest for immediacy is, what connects me to Slowear today. SJ: As you collaborate with Slowear for the exhibition in Paris, what are you most looking forward to?OV: Within the Slowear group I have been fortunate to meet passionate people who  understand the joy of sharing. I hope that Paris will be the starting point for a long collaboration. My hope is to see The Festina Lente Project travel internationally. SJ: Can you tell us about the most interesting personalities you have met while capturing these 1,000 pictures for the exhibition Festina Lente to be exhibited at the Slowear store?OV: I have had a hard time making a choice, each portrait reminds me of an anecdote, because I spoke with each of them for half an hour & it is hard to reveal stories that were revealed to me in confidence. To me, the most important thing is that they will all be featured in respect of individual differences (cultural, social, & religious). To see such kindness, respect, tolerance, deeply reassures the idealistic man in me. SJ: Finally, could you describe in a few words your idea of a 'slow lifestyle'?OV: The ephemeral has become the norm as well as the disease of the century, making us eternally unsatisfied & dreaming of a better tomorrow. ‘Things you own, end up owning you’. For me, it is above all about ‘taking time’. That is to say taking time out for friends, enjoying a good meal, contemplating & being bored!

[...]

05.24.2016

Roy Dantendorfer was only 25 when he took over the family business, three boutiques (in Salzburg, Linz and Innsbruck) selling clothes and sports equipment, and turned into something different and unique by putting together a portfolio of international brands according to his own impeccable taste, and focusing on well-made, timeless, quality pieces. In the 1990s he opened the Vienna store, which has gradually become a not-to-be-missed address for discerning customers visiting the Austrian capital, and became  himself  an international style icon along with his wife Theda Wendenburg, who is also his partner in work. A couple of months ago, Roy opened the first Slowear Store in Vienna, right beside his own boutique. On the occasion of the grand opening, we spoke to Roy to learn more about his style vision and what led him to partner with Slowear. SJ: Hi Roy, can you tell us more about the man behind the Dantendorfer vision? How much do you identify with the brand?RD: For more than 20 years we have been expanding our vision of what Dantendorfer embodies,where our appreciation for quality, craftsmanship and a sense of uniqueness are portrayed. Being a family business in the 2nd generation, it has always been of importance to consider the roots of our company, while simultaneously striving to explore and collect new things for our store. My partner and I are doing all orders together, which enables us to consider different things from both viewpoints. We both therefore identify fully with ‘Dantendorfer’ the brand, since all items shown in our stores are based on what we see and like while travelling. SJ: What's your idea of style and to what extent does your personal taste have to do with it?RD: The idea of style is a highly diverse project which is hard to generalize. I think it would be impossible for us to select fashion that is based on one specific idea of style. For me it is much more important to choose items based on what I like, what inspires me, the stories behind the brands, the passionate artisans who are able to transmit their discipline and craft into things that my customers and I value for their uniqueness and rich heritage. Our store ranges from menswear and womenswear to sportswear, all of which require different styles and brands - which however are all based on our intuition of what our customers would like. My personal taste is important in order to create a homogenous vision behind Dantendorfer, in which our diverse portfolio of brands forms our vision. SJ: What is it about Slowear that you love and believe is in tune with your own philosophy?RD: Slowear is a familiy buisness just like Dantendorfer, which in itself is already very special as you can simply feel and appreciate the wonderful history and foundation behind it. Attention to the craft and high quality of all the items is something that I look for in any brand that I love. Glanshirt, Incotex, Montedoro and Zanone are all special in their own way, and  when combined in a store they create a very harmonious concept. I am always drawn to clothes that are beautifully made with attention to intricate details; Slowear is a feel-good, look-good brand with a great heritage and thats why I love it. SJ: Let's talk about Vienna: can you recommend a few 'slow' places in town and give us some basic insider tips how to experience the city?RD: My recommendation is to simply walk through the side streets of this wonderful city and discover small shops and cafes like Cafe Korb or Cafe Bräunerhof. Have lunch at Zum Schwarzen Kamel and have dinner at the wonderful Gasthaus Pöschl, and of course a nice drink at Loos Bar.

[...]

04.07.2016

Sophistication, extreme care for details, artisan quality: Slowear and Carlo Moretti’s glass factory truly share most of their core values - including their origins, rooting in Venice’s authentic arts and crafts. To celebrate this innate syntony, we planned something special on the occasion of the forthcoming Salone del Mobile: Slowear’s sartorial style meets Carlo Moretti’s sophisticated design at our via Solferino Milan boutique, where the whole collection of Moretti’s Bora glasses will be on display and available for purchase from April 11 to 21.  The Carlo Moretti Temporary Emporium @ The Slowear Store will be an exclusive opportunity for viewing the whole collection of 54 unique artisan pieces whose design is inspired by the north-eastern wind of the same name. Asymmetrical and almost ‘bent’ by a strong blast, these glasses look as if they had been struck by a sudden gust when still incandescent and in the process of being made by glass artisans. An incredibly evocative image that gave birth to a set of transparent Murano crystal glasses with an irregular, tilted shape, individually signed and dated.  “All Bora glasses are mouth blown”, explain the master glassmakers, “and there is no standard manufacturing time - it all depends on the decoration of each single piece, all of which are strictly hot applied”. If you wish to bring home a piece of this gorgeous collection, this could be just the right occasion to take a look at the whole collection. The Carlo Moretti Emporium @ The Slower Store Milano Solferino will be open starting April 11 at 6 p.m.

[...]

11.19.2015

It looks like a huge and contemporary library lounge, with tall bookcases and design sofas, and yet there are not (only) books on its shelves, but accurately selected men’s garments and accessoriesJacket Required is a Tokyo store which started out as a paper fashion catalogue and later developed into a brand specializing in the sale of international first class goods, with one point of sale in Tokyo, one in Osaka and a web store. Until November 24, the Aoyama Jacket Required boutique fwill be ahousing the Slowear pop-up store, featuring items from the AW 2015/2016 collections and also offering all customers the opportunity to pre-order items from the Incotex SS 2016 collection. A great chance to appreciate the scenic beauty of Jacket Required and to get a preview of the upcoming Incotex collection.

[...]

11.09.2015

A company rooted in Valdobbiadene, the land of Prosecco, that has been producing great wines for centuries never failing to respect nature and people, and retaining its artisan quality in spite of globalization. When it comes to Italian sparkling wines, Foss Marai undoubtedly stands as a synonym for excellence, which is why Slowear chose this prestigious name for a partnership which aims at promoting the essence of Made in Italy worldwide and particularly in Japan, where quality and authenticity are highly regarded as crucial values. From November 20 to 23,  Foss Marai will be offering all our guests at The Slowear Store Matsuya Ginza in Tokyo, , friends and customers a series of tasting events entirely dedicated to this renowned Prosecco produced in the Treviso area by the Biasiotto family, which owns and runs Foss Marai. Ranging from rare qualities such as Prosecco Superiore di Cartizze, made with grapes exclusively grown on a small hill in Valdobbiadene, to brut and extra-dry sparkling wines and the floral sweetness of Passito Reale Moscato, the world of Foss Marai wines is a veritable journey in taste, coupled with the beauty of its artisan bottles made in Murano. Those who will drop by the store on the first day of the event, November 20, will also have the opportunity to take part in some nice food tastings specially conceived to match the wines.

[...]

10.30.2015

Barcellona, Passeig de Gracia. Along the street that is home to Barcelona’s most luxurious stores, Santa Eulalia is a veritable institution, a boutique founded in 1843 and owned by the same family since 1915. The bright and refined spaces of the boutique - which is deemed one of the 10 top multibrand stores worldwide - are currently offering a veritable ‘Slow Shopping Experience’ by housing Slowear’s fisrt Barcelona pop-up store, a small scale reproduction of an authentic Slowear Store. This amazing corner has been accurately laid out to offer the same sophisticated and yet relaxed atmosphere of every Slowear Store in the world, with vintage armchairs, vinyl records and book welcoming anyone willing to take their time to discover the new collections from the group’s brands while experiencing the Slowear world and its very unique philosophy. The pop-up store will close its doors on November 23, yet the Slowear brands will still be available at Santa Eulalia with a selection of fine items.

[...]

07.01.2015

Parma is a beautiful Italian city where art and cuisine literally rule. On the occasion of our fifth Showcooking Session, we hosted a friend from Parma, Valerio Brozzi, who manages historic menswear boutique Brando. Brando perfectly matches the Slowear spirit, showing a great love for quality and a tendency to revisit trends rather than simply following them. Valerio prepared a typically Parmesan family recipe – his granny’s tortelli d’erbetta (chard dumplings). We asked him to tell us about his hometown and his recipe. SJ: What’s the ‘Slow’ face of Parma? Is there anything you would recommend to see if we were to stay in your hometown for one day? VB: You definitely should not miss historic Teatro Farnese, a magnificent wooden theatre whose existence most tourists ignore.And then of course the restaurants. We’ve got plenty of great restaurants; my favourite one is Cocchi, quite well-known and yet far from mainstream, and definitey authentic, focusing on homemade local cuisine. Aperitivo is our evening ritual in Parma – try T Café, a central venue (tucked away in a narrow street close to Piazza Duomo) where they offer an excellent wine list, or Croce di Malta. If you’re looking for a typical Parmesan experience, though, head to Enoteca Fontana for delicious sanwiches and top-notch local cold cuts.The latest trend is the casual, take-away version of a classic Parmesan dish, tortellini in brodo (in broth), that’s usually consumed on festive Sundays. You can now grab your own serving on the street, which is totally cool. SJ: What are you going to cook for us today, and why?VB: I only started cooking a couple of years ago, and I usually make sweets so… preparing a first course is quite a whole new world to me! I chose tortelli d’erbetta, a local dish from Parma that can be found in many different variations in the whole Emilia Romagna region. This recipe, which is actually my grandma’s, is usually prepared by Parmesan housewifes (rezdoras) on festive days. It is one of the very few meat-free recipes in a tradition based on on a fest of pork meat cold-cuts, and it’s trulypart of my own culture so I thought it would be nice to share it with you guys! Here’s Valerio’s tortelli d’erbetta recipe: Ingredients (serves 5/6)500g plain flour5 eggs + 1 for the filling200g chard300g ricotta cheese125g Mascarpone cheese200g grated Parmesan cheese + more for servingbutterolive olilsaltpeppernutmeg powderfresh sage leaves First of all, make your dough, placing the flour on a table and making a large hole in the middle of the mound; brake one egg at a time in the hole and delicately whip them with a fork, slowly mixing them with the flour. When everything is amalgamated, add a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of oil and start kneading with your hands. Shape the dough into a ball, wrap it up in clingfilm and let it rest in a cool place for 1 hour.In the meantime, make the filling: stew the chard in a pan with a drizzle of oil, drain well and chop it. Mix it with ricotta and Mascarpone, add grated Parmesan cheese, nutmeg powder, salt, pepper and a raw egg. Let the filling cool down.Roll out the dough and cut it into squares with sides of approximately 6 centimeters. Place one small knob of filling on each square and fold it into a rectangle, sealing edges with the prongs of a fork. Boil your tortelli in hot salted water, drain them and serve them with sage-flavored melted butter and grated Parmesan cheese

[...]

06.29.2015

For our fourth Slowear Showcooking Session we had the pleasure to host Mr. Damon M. Pittman, PHD professor at Domus Academy in Milan. Damon was born in Washington D.C., he has a degree in Clothing, Textiles, and Fashion Design and has worked in sales and marketing in such cities as Amsterdam, London, New York, Paris, and Milan for over 20 years. Since 2009 he has worked at NABA and Domus Academy in Milan leading courses in fashion marketing, and of course he has become very familiar with Italian cuisine.We asked him what he thinks about it. SJ: What’s the best word to describe the Italian cuisine ?DP: Quality. SJ: Why is that ?DP: Italian cuisine always involves something special. You can be sure that when you are invited to dinner by an Italian, there is going to be a lot of passion and love inside the creation of every dish. They would never take vegetables from the freezer but instead go the market and handpick the best and ripest ones; this is what makes Italian cuisine stand out in both quality and taste. SJ: Do you think that creativity and innovation play an important role in the Italian cuisine?DP: I hope I won’t get into trouble now, but no, I don't think so. Don’t get me wrong though, I love Italian dishes. I come from Washington and even at Thanksgiving, when all Americans traditionally eat turkey, I always wished for italian dishes such a lasagne. Italians want to show their culture and heritage through their cuisine, which makes it special and unique. SJ: Let’s talk about what you are preparing for us today.DP: I didn't want to make anything Italian (although it is my favorite food), because I thought everyone would be preparing something Italian. So making something a little different would be better for everyone. Here’s Damon’s roasted salmon fillet recipe: IngredientsSalmon fillets (1 per person)ButterBlack riceAsparagi Rinse each salmon fillet in cool water and pat it dry with paper towels. Place the fillet skin side down in the pan.  Pour a few tablespoons of melted butter over the fillet, then sprinkle a teaspoon of seasoned salt over the fish. Cook the dish in the oven at about 400 degrees for 20 minutes or until the fish is flaky when using a fork. Serve on boiled black rice and top with steamed asparagi.

[...]

06.26.2015

Film director, professor, vegetarian cuisine enthusiast and friend Marco Pozzi has come to our showroom today for a special Showcooking Session. Marco cooked a magnificent blueberry risotto for us and our clients, and we seized the opportunity to ask him a few questions about himself. SJ: You have quite and impressive curriculum. What do you do for a living?MP: I’ am a cross-media communicator. After graduating at Università Cattolica in Milan, I taught Social Communications at the same University for a few years, then one day I accidentally discovered my love for the film industry and moved to Rome. I volunteered as an assistant to quite a few big names, including Mario Monicelli.In 1995 I shot my very first short movie, and my second one, Doom, released in 1996, was awarded at Venice Film Festival. In the year 2000 I released my first feature film, and started doing some commercial work (mostly corporate videos and TV commercials); I shot a series called Bradipo (2001-2002) for MTV Italia and a couple of documentaries on the Italian resistance movement, which were presented at international comoetitions including venice and Berlin film festivals.I currently own a ‘creative factory’ called Quelquechose, specializing in audiovisual contents for a variety of brands. SJ: Can a film director live exclusively on shooting films in today’s Italy?MP: I honestly doubt it. Only a few great directors manage to do that  - huge talents like Matteo Garrone and Paolo Sorrentino. SJ: Let’ Talk about today’s recipe: why did you choose a vegetarian dish? MP: I have been a vegetarian for 20 years. I like to think of myself as a “vegetarian by nature”: I never really liked meat, even as a kid my parents had fo force me into eating it! To me, it’s really just a matter taste. Here is Marco’s blueberry risotto recipe: Serves 4360g rice (arborio or carnaroli)Extra virgin olive oil1 glass dry white wineVegetable stock80g fresh blueberries0,30l blueberry and apple juice1 small scallion100g grated parmesan cheese100g fresh goat’s milk ricotta Chop the scallion finely, sauté it with olive oil, add the rice and simmer with white wine until evaporated. Cook in vegetable stock and juice on low heat and add parmesan when almost ready. Cream with ricotta. Decorate each serving with fresh blueberries.

[...]

06.23.2015

There is a pleasant summer feeling at our Milan showroom these days - only the summer in question is not the one that’s just started, but the next one. With the preview of the Slowear spring/summer 2016 collections under way, we decided to size the opportunity to spend some quality time with the clients, friends and partners that usually come to see us in Milan during our sales compigns, and since the SS16 collections will revolve around the idea of flavor we opted for a foodie experience. Every day at lunchtime for a couple of weeks we will be sharing recipes, ingredients and flavors: our guests will turn into hosts and cook for everyone else through a series of live cooking events in the showroom, telling the stories behind their recipes and expressing their own interpretation of the Slowear style through food. Our Communications Director, who is also an experienced foodblogger, has been the very first amateur chef to break the ice with a couple of delicious Sicilian recipes - Pasta alla Norma (in a rich tomato sauce topped with fried eggplants and ricotta salata) and Sarde a Beccafico (stuffed sardines) - and a gourmet selection of homemade cakes, including a sumptuous Pavlova. Next, our friends and clients Andrea and Marco prepared two fresh and summery recipes with simple ingredients and sophisticated details: orecchiette alla crudaiola, a dish of traditional Apulian pasta with raw date tomatoes, basil and ricotta salata, and a gorgeous green pea cream topped with grilled cuttlefish and confit cherry tomatoes. And there’s more coming up, including regional dishes, traditional American specialities and even vegan options. Stay tuned for more recipes.

[...]

05.25.2015

In Brusselles, along Avenue Louise, is one of the worlds most renowned and amazing mens boutique, Maison Degand, housed inside a magnificent mansion with a dépendance and a cozy courtyad, a truly charming place where beauty is all around you - in the garments, in the decor, in the location itself. Neeedless to say, it is a true privilege to have our Slowear collection featured among the brands selected by founder Pierre Degand, the man who, with the help of his skilled tailors and couturiers, managed to become a major influencer in luxury and masculine elegance all over Brussels and Belgium.We spoke to himto learn more about the history of his Maison. SJ: Can you tell us about the origin and the development of Maison Degand?PD: It all began with Yvonne Degand, my mother, who passed on to me her savoir-faire and her savoir-flair. It is thanks to her that I developed a taste for dressing sophisticatedly and the art of advising gentlemen on how to choose the best materials in prêt à porter and bespoke wear.Maison Degand opened its doors in 1983 at 415, di Avenue Louise with the Degand Tailleur department, which mainly offered top-notch mens suits and jackets.In September 1996 we launched Degand Sport, located in the mansions dépendance, thus opening up to sportswear. In 2007, with Degand Business at 419, Avenue Louise, we started offering suits priced at 1,000 euros.2011 was a year of huge changes: Degand Sport and Degand Business were moved to number 419, and are now connected to Degand Tailleur through a perfume shop. And we also opened Degand Shoes in the dépendance. SJ: What is it that makes Maison Degand so unique and different from the other luxury boutiques in Brussels? PD: Well, first of all Maison Degand is a veritable historic mansion focusing on niche products for men, a space devoted to multi-brand and non-marketed items. The main difference lies in our signature style, a mix of advising services and product range that you just wont find at monobrand boutiques. Our clients are well aware of the fact that at Maison Degand they will be able to find items mostly unavailable anywhere else. We also rely strongly on an exceptionally wide offer, professional advice from our assistants, a top-quality and customized range of services, and a sumptuos decor - not to mention the sartorial altering service with 11 dedicated people and the atelier grand mesure for bespoke mens haute couture. SJ: The recent renovation of your premises also included the opening of a restaurant in the mansions beautiful courtyard...PD: Emily Ristorante brings Degands signature elegance to the table thanks toVincenzo Regines mise en scène. The restaurant is devoted to Italian cuisine, and more specifically to excellent regional products like truffles, caviar and Sassicaia wine. I personally supervised every single detail, from the majestic chandelier to the blazon imprinted on butter pats and the silverware. We can sit up to 40 people on two levels, and theres an additional room for private dinners and events sitting 12 people. Edited and translated by F.S.

[...]

04.21.2015

Extra virgin olive oil is one of the most remarkable products of excellence in Italy, and yet the debate over its quality is heated by the constant discovery of frauds. Since the best way to avoid adulterated products is knowing how to recognize authentic extra virgin olive oil, we asked Miciyo Yamada, the first – and so far only – professional Japanese Italian olive oil taster to explain us how to do it. Miciyo was born in Kyoto, but she soon moved to Europe, graduated from the Sorbonne in Paris and spent many years in Italy working as a journalist and a publisher. Her love for Italian excellence led her to discover the world of extra virgin oive oil, and today she is part of  those panels that safeguard consumer rights by judging oil quality and reporting the oils that have no claim to call themselves extra virgin. SJ: Can you tell us how you first developed a interest in olive oil? MY: Years ago, as a journalist, while writing a story on extra virgin olive oil I got to know quite a few companies and I fell in love with this charming product, to the point of becoming an enthisiast. I decided to start my sommelier training straight away, and I eventually became an official taster. A few months later, panel groups and international competition contacted me and I became a judge. I took part in major contests such as the Copenhagen International Olive Oil Awards, the Japan Olive Oil Prize, the AIPO d’Argento in Verona, and the New York International Olive Oil CompetitionSJ: How do you become an oil sommelier - or rather a professional oil taster recognized by the Italian Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry Policies?MY: First of all you need to do your training, by attending officially recognized technical courses and schools and taking part in a set number of tasting sessions. While wine tasters can rely on self-certification as a testimony of their skills, oil tasters need the written approval of Chamber of Commerce in order the to be put on the National Register.Of course, continuing education is crucial for your personal enrichment; I often attend courses and seminars at Dipartimento di Analisi Sensoriale di Cesena, a branch of the Faculty of Agriculture at Università di Bologna. SJ: Which features do you evaluate when tasting olive oil?MY: Technical tasting begins with an olfactory approach, allowing you to assess if the oil is flawless, and thus extra virgin. You then move on to gustative tasting, taking a small sip of oil to perceive the nasal aftertaste and the pungent attribute, a feature that all extra virgin olive oils need to have.Bitterness is another positive attribute that many extra virgin olive oils have. As for the scent, since it is an unfiltered natural juice, extra virgin olive oil has herbaceous notes, often accompanied by by notes of apple, almond, and green tomato - especially when it comes to fruity oils. Yet there is no such thing as lemon, orange or strawberry notes. SJ: Is there a way to easily tell a good oil  from a bad one?MY: Its pretty easy. Anyone can sniff oil and perceive the fresh, herbaceous notes of olive and oilve leaves: that is the hallmark of extra virgin olive oil. If those notes are missing, then it cannot be extra virgin. SJ: You will soon be our guest at selected Slowear Store boutiques for an oil tasting tour. Can you tell us how you will introduce our customers to the world of extra virgin olive oil and which oil brands you have selected for the tastings?MY: First of all I will explain them how technical tasting works - it has clear, very simple rules. I will then teach them how to recognize extra virgin olive oil by comparing an adulterated sample with an excellent one. Finally, I will invite them to discover the notes and the scents and to share their thoughts.As for the oil brand, the product of excellence I chose for this occasion is Nettaribleo by Agrestis, a Sicilian company based in Buccheri, near Catania. Nettaribleo won six prizes in 2015 and its main assets are a green tomato note and a subtle bitterness. It is a great natural flavor enhancer, especially on a simple  tomato salad. The first stop of Miciyos oil tasting tour is planned for May 23 at Officina Slowear - Tokyo Midtown. Follow our Facebook page for more updates on the next stops. Translated and edited by F.S.Photo: Foodista

[...]

02.11.2015

There is something truly charming about wandering around Paduas city center - it is probably the feeling of being surrounded by history, of walking along ancient streets that are somewhat solemn and yet welcoming. Although certainly not the most popular one, Padua is a classic Italian art city, small enough to allow you to walk around the whole historic center, and prominent enough to have a past that has been blessed with the presence of great artists  like Giotto and Donatello who enriched its churches, streets and palaces. Enjoying the spirit of Padua is pretty easy: just plunge into Medieval times as you walk along the streets that go from Piazza delle Erbe - where people meet every night to sip on a classic spritz aperitivo - to Piazza dei Signori, then head straight into the majestic Reinassance atmosphere of Prato della Valle, Europes second largest square. Finally, stop for a coffee at legendary Caffè Pedrocchi, where the citys intellectuals used to meet to discuss their theories and ideas. Via San Canziano is an old street not far from Caffè Pedrocchi, literally surrounded by beauty - and thats where our latest store is about to open. Behind The Slowear Store Padua is a successful Venetian group led by Pietro Pavin, who managed to open over 30 top-notch boutiques throughout the Veneto region in spite of the global crisis. "Slowear is on our same wavelength. We love the quality of its brands and its smart casual style" says Alberto Pavin, 28, son of Pietro and in charge of the new Slowear boutique. "And I believe Padua is the perfect location". As for the secret formula of Pavin groups huge success, Alberto is quite clear-headed about it: "Investing in quality is crucial, in every respect: from products to services, from after sales support to the strategic location of our boutiques".The Slowear Store Padua will open its doors on February 14. The address is 7, via San Canziano.

[...]

01.28.2015

Leafing through the latest issue of the Wallpaper* Magazine to look for some fresh inspiration is something we are all pretty familiar with. There is nothing like Wallpaper* when it comes to keeping up to date with everything thats new, cool, and exciting. Behind the global success of this London-based magazine is the hard work of its editors and contributors - and the talent of its Editor in Chief, Tony Chambers. Tony is responsible for the growth of the Wallpaper* brand over the last few years - so if you are a keen user of the magazines website or a compulsive reader of the Wallpaper pocket City Guides (published in conjunction with Phaidon press) you should probably thank him. We asked him a few question about himself and his job. SJ: Whats it like to be the Editor in Chief of the most influential design, fashion and lifestyle magazine? Does it ever make you hyper conscious about your style and lifestyle choices?TC: Well, its possibly the best job on the planet. Im never self-conscious about such things – Im a great believer in authenticity and doing / enjoying what comes naturally. SJ: Describe yourself in 3 words.TC: A lucky man. SJ: On an average weekday you never leave home without...?TC: A pen. I feel insecure if Im without the means to make notes or sketches. I also find it hard to concentrate on reading page proofs without a pen in my hand. SJ: Living and working in London must be exciting and hectic. Whats your strategy for carving out some time for leisure and meditation?TC: My job is my hobby and passion, so leisure conflates with work. Finding time to think and reflect is hugely important. Walking and cycling is a good opportunity to indulge in this. SJ: If someone had 24 hours to spend in London, what and where would you suggest them to go (eat, shop, visit, sleep)?TC: Eat at St John. Shop at Kilgour, 1205 and Slowear of course. Visit the Barbican. Sleep in the Antony Gormley suite at the Beaumont. SJ: We have recently had the great pleasure of partnering with on the occasion of the Wallpaper + Zanone Project - can yoiu tell us whats the idea behind it?TC: We selected three unique colours, used on the Wallpaper* magazine spine, that work particularly well with the supreme quality cashmere and silk Zanone yarn.  Im deliriously happy with the results. SJ: Are you planning to start more partnerships with fashion and design companies to create collections and objects?TC: We certainly are! We do of course have our annual Handmade project (6th year this April) which is a wunderkammer of creative collaborations. Look out for some major developments this Spring. Edited by F.S.

[...]

01.21.2015

The day has finally come: there is a brand new Slowear Store in Paris in addition to our historic rue Vieille du Temple boutique in the Marais district, and it is a veritable multipurpose concept store entirley devoted to slow lifestyle and the slow shopping experience. Besides our collections, the store will offer everything that revolves around the Slowear style universe - vinyl records, photographs, beauty products, and leather goods - as well as quiet and comfortable corners where customers will be able to spend some leisure time reading, listening to music, and wine tasting. Located in the heart of the citys luxury shopping district – the address is 169, Boulevard Saint Germain – our new Paris store is housed inside a historic building and set across two floors. Designed by Milan-based architecture studio Carlo Donati, it draws inspiration from 1940s Italian design, with period references, sophisticated details, original pieces, and a dash of contemporary style. Every single ornament and piece of furniture has been carefully selected to create an authentic and homey atmosphere, so that customers will feel comfortably at home surrounded by books, records, and beautiful objects. Facilities include a lounge area where you can sit and leaf through a book or drink coffee, a listening area, and a space devoted to exclusive hair, beard and moustache services. Finally, to top up your Parisian slow shopping experience with some good music and a glass of fine wine, the basement will be regularly hosting events and wine tasting sessions.

[...]

12.01.2014

He is the creative mind behind the style of The Slowear Store, the one who designs and fits out each space devoted to the Slow Shopping Experience.   Architect Carlo Donati of Studio Donati in Milan really is our guy when it comes to understanding the ideas and references that inspire each one of our stores. We asked him a few questions about the creative process that leads to their unique design. SJ: Designing retail spaces for the fashion industry has been your game ever since the Nineties. What changed in the way these spaces have been conceived over the years?CD: The design of fashion retail stores has always been inspired by contemporary trends in architecture. Back in the 1980s everything was opulent and flashy whereas the 1990s brought along a minimalist and almost detached style. More recently, globalization and the need to somehow standardize their image led the major brands to make all their stores around the world look exactly the same. SJ: What struck you most of the Slowear philisophy when you decided to work with us?CD: The idea of offering all customers an emotional experience every time the enter one of our stores. The ambition to create comfortable and welcoming spaces that will make them feel at home, free to relax, leaf through a book, listen to some good music as if they were at a friends - a friend who owns amazing clothes, and a friend they will certainly come to see again soon. I also loved the idea of shopping selectively - choosing a few, high quality items over a lot of cheaper and second-rate stuff. These concepts were the inspiration behind every single Slowear Store I designed. SJ: How do you reconcile the need to create a unique personality for each store with the need to preserve a shared and recognizable identity?CD: I worked with the Slowear team to create spaces with a soul, featuring site-specific references as well as shared elements - such as the brass wardrobes, a huge table, and a bookcase. For every single store we selected vintage and custom-made furniture to add some personality, so that our customers will immediately recognize the store as part of the Slowear group, and yet they will also be able to  appreciate the differences and the peculiarities of each specific space. This way, they will not experience the disorientation that comes from entering those chain stores that look all the same everywhere in the world. SJ: How is the Slowear Store concept evolving?CD: We started out with the idea of a homey space conveying a sense of comfort, cosiness, and well-being. This is still our vision, although we are willing to make our retail spaces more and more sophisticated, scattered with unique and vintage pieces of furniture to create a stronger and more authentic personality. We do not want to design everything thats in our stores; we want to add one piece after another, gradually, selecting only great stuff just like you do at home - only under the guidance of an experts eye. SJ: Finally, wed like to ask you a personal question: whats your idea of a slow lifestyle and how do you reconcile it with your everyday life in a big, busy and hectic city like Milan?CD: Milan certainly is a hectic city - the pace of life and work can get almost overwhelming.  And yet if you learn to manage your time consciously a slow lifestyle is still possible. Take the way you deal with the traffic, for instance: I could never give up on my cycling, it allows me to take things slow and to experience the city differently. Its just like tasting some great food: as long as you are savouring it, time slows down and you get to focus on its taste. This can work for everything in life!

[...]

11.23.2014

Following the openings at Dosan Park and Hyundai Main, The Slowear Store just debuted at prestigious Hyunday Kintex department store in Seoul with a new and roomy point of sale: over 1,000 square feet entirely devoted to the Slowear brands, including our womens collections. Designed by Milan-based Carlo Donati studio, the store has a sophisticated and warm atmosphere - a signature feature of The Slowear Stores along with the lounge areas conceived to offer all customers the chance to try a “slow shopping experience”, listening to old vynils or leafing through a book surrounded by French modern antique chairs and coffee tables, iconic design lamps and unique vintage pieces. At the heart of the store is a huge period wooden counter, while burnished brass and smoked glass wardrobes inspired by the style of 1940s designer Jean Prouvé sit along the walls. The shelving is reminscent of the work of Charlotte Perriand, a pioneer of contemporary design - yet another subtle reference. But there are more intimate and familiar suggestions as well, such as the slightly retro wallpaper panels in the back of the wardrobes. Most of the furniture has been designed by studio Donati and custom made for The Slowear Store ay Hyundai-Kintex, according to a refined color palette which ranges from warm white to light blue-grey and blue-black, contrasting with the dark red carpeting, another Slowear classic.

[...]

11.05.2014

A small and exclusive collection conceived for bicycle lovers and for those who ride to work every day and maybe enjoy a drink in the afternoon. Designed for Mr Porter, our official online reseller, Slowear Urban Cycling is inspired by the need to ride comfortably without giving up your style - because cycling does not necessarily mean going fast or wearing technical apparel, right? So we took Slowears signature smart casual style and added a touch of comfort, warmth, and flexibility, devising fresh solutions such as the blazer collar, which has reflective material on the underside and can be worn upturned when cycling at night to increase visibility. During the day, when the collar is worn turned down, the trick goes unnoticed. The collection also includes trouser cuffs fitted with a popper fastening that can be secured around the ankle to keep them away from the bike chain, reflective straps on the outer pockets of the blazer to secure the flaps by folding them upwards, additional pockets matching convenience and style, and merino wool knitwear with great breathability and thermoregulation properties. The Slowear Urban Cycling collection will be exceptionally on sale at some of our stores for a limited period of time. The collections items will be on display in our windows along with a selection of foldable bicycles by Tern. Heres the Urban Cycling tour schedule: The Slowear Store Milano Solferino: November 10 - 16The Slowear Store Treviso: November 19 - 26Officina Slowear Paris: December 1 - 9

[...]

06.25.2014

There’s no denying it: Bangkok is a frantic city. Yet it is also a city full of surprises, and so right when you think you’re close to getting mad you’re bound to bump into an incredibly quiet  little temple right in the middle of the traffic, with a beautiful altar and sweet-smelling flower chains. True story. Siwilai is one of such surprises. It is not a temple, though, but a design-oriented concept store bringing together a print media and vinyl library, a beauty lab, toys and gadgets section, a “Thai-Made” department, a selection of fashion and lifestyle brands and a quality restaurant. Siwilai is also one of our wholesale selected stores. We spoke to Punjarat Sangsuwan, the store’s Marketing and Operations Director, and asked her about life in Bangkok. SJ: What are your main passions?PS: Travelling, art and music. SJ: Describe yourself in 3 words.PS: Fun, lively, individual. SJ:You never leave home without… ?PS: My "Lady Danger" MAC lipstick. SJ: What is it like living and working in Bangkok?PS: Living in Bangkok allows an eclectic lifestyle since the city has everything to offer. Life here is quite cultured, sophisticated and even adventurous at times. The city is very communed, connected and networking so when your work can shake the city, living here gets pretty interesting. SJ: What does Bangkok offer that no other city, in your opinion, can offer?PS: The city is so vibrant, diverse, rich in culture and cosmopolitan. Everything is accessible and just around the corner. It has a very dynamic energy and it is undergoing a fast-paced change. Yet, in spite of all this, I find it is somewhat relaxed at times. SJ: If someone had 24 hours to spend in Bangkok, what and where would you suggest them to go (eat, shop, visit, sleep)?PS: Eat: Seven Spoons in old town Bangkok, a warm, minimalist gastrobar. Shop: SIWILAI and Jatujak Market. Visit: Made by Legacy flea market – a project happeing twice a year. Nighlife: Wongs Place. Sleep: The Siam or Sala Ratanakosin. SJ: And finally, since this is The Slowear Journal, could you describe in a few words your idea of a slow lifestyle?PS: When you live in a city like Bangkok, balancing your mind, body and spirit is pretty much needed. Luckily, Thailand is rich in nature. It only takes a two hours drive to reach my beach house in HuaHin. Spending a few days there every month, just on weeekends, allows me to stop, take a deep full breath and start my own kind of slow life.It begins with no rush and getting in touch with nature. Breakfast in the morning, then baking myself in the sun for a warm honey skin tone with a good read. And finally a walk along the beach in the evening, with my feet in the sand and the waves brushing them softly. That’s how I free my mind from negative energy.

[...]

06.16.2014

[...]

06.10.2014

After 124 years and just the one move from Swanston Street over 50 years ago Henry Bucks, Australia’s oldest and best menswear store, have just given their famous flagship store on Collins Street a new look, feel and direction. Perhaps one of the last of the great menswear retail specialists to remain in family hands in an age where globalisation, rationalisation and the expediency of mass marketing and poor levels of service are what we have become accustomed to expect Henry Bucks owes its name to a soft goods trader of British origins who migrated to Australia in 1887 and opened his first store three years later in Melbourne. These days, the 5th generation of the Bucks family is in charge of the company, which now  owns 3 stores in Melbourne, 2 in Sydney and one in Adelaide. Because of its history and of its values, Henry Bucks is our obvious choice for a partner in Australia, which is why the Collins Street store is also Slowear’s Australia exclusive stockist. As for the brand new flagship store, it features an impressive 750 square meters space on two levels, spacious without losing its friendly, clubby feel and contemporary without forgetting its glorious heritage. By raising the roof and changing all the fittings and fixtures, the project has literally tranformed the place, managing to retain its personality and history. The upstairs area is now a contemporary menswear hub, while downstairs you will find the traditional collections. In the alley next to the store, where many beautiful cafes and restaurants lie, stands an amazing sculpture inspired by Melbourne. Our corner is right at the front of the store as you walk in.

[...]

05.14.2014

Do you remember A Slow Tale, our short movie competition? The challenge was that of turning the idea of a slow lifestyle into a script - a short, well written story told through a few and eloquent scenes. An international expert jury from Domus Academy, IULM and Naba slected the work of Alessio Billi, who had the unique opportunity to see his own script, Le ali degli angeli  (Angel Wings), become a professional short movie. Alessios film is a slow tale revolving around grapes, wine and dedication told on a backdrop of gentle hills and vineyards. It is the story of a delicate conversion to the  slow lifestyle, with a surprise ending. Turning an abstract idea into a script and condensing a whole world view into a 5-minutes video was no easy job, and yet Alessio managed to do it with remarkable mastery. We are so proud of you Alessio, congratulations and keep up the good work! You can watch Le ali degli angeli on YouTube or Vimeo. Enjoy and tell us what you think!

[...]

04.06.2014

Ready for Fuorisalone? If you happen to be in Milan during the busy and exciting days of Milan’s Design Week (April 8-13), drop by our via Solferino store and for every Slowear purchase you’ll get a free copy of Port Survey,  Port Magazine’s special issue on Innovation in Architecture and Design. Port Magazine is a global quarterly men’s magazine based in London, merging style with thoughtful, intelligent content. We do love this publication and thats why we decided to partner with them; during the Design Week, Officina Slowear Milano Solferino will also be one of Port Magazines authorised dealers. On this occasion, we asked a few questions to publisher and creative director Kuchar Swara on the subject of this amazing design-focused Port Survey. SJ: How did you come up with the idea of focusing the Port Survey on Innovation in Architecture & Design?KS: Working with my colleagues, we wanted to produce a honest snapshot of what the industry is thinking: the movers and shakers of the last 12 months in the industry.We did not want to vote ourselves. We were only interested in the votes from industry, completely unbiased, non political and true. I admire a quality in good design and architecture that enables us to look at the worlds construction and ask: can it be better? SJ: Whats your opinion on Milans Fuorisalone? What do you expect from this new edition?KS: I think its a brilliant week for Italy and Milan. It reminds everyone of how truly wonderful Italy can be. I expect surprises and Negronis. SJ: This is The Slowear Journal, the first eMagazine entirely dedicated to the slow lifestyle - a vision of the world whose concerns are quality, details, and the most authentic essence of products and relationships. The kind of spaces we love are those which can boost and promote this continuous search for quality. What do you think is the main challenge for architecture and design from the slow point of view?KS: We need to make design & architecture more accessible to more people. For me the general principle of good design is best served when its for the benefit of many rather than the few. SJ: Do you ever manage to carve out some slow moments from your busy schedule? Whats your idea of a slow lifestyle?KS: A fine glass of whisky with friends on the Isle of Skye this summer. SJ: Which slow and prominent design works would you advise our readers not to miss for the world?KS: Anything by Finn Juhl. Or more contemporarily Michael Anastassiadess – a truly gifted designer. If you wish to learn more on the Architecture and Design Survey, come to Officina Slowear in via Solferino. See you in Milan! Photo by Paul Barbera

[...]

03.19.2014

Living and working in Melbourne, Christian Kimber is a designer and Menswear Buyer at Henry Bucks – Australia’s oldest and best menswear store, now selling our brands. We asked him to give us some insider’s tips on how to enjoy the best of the Australian style capital.  SJ: Please tell us in few words your main passions.CK: Clothes, shoes and my family. SJ:Describe yourself in 3 words.CK: Relaxed, patient, perfectionist. SJ: You never leave home without… ?CK: A quality pen, my watch, my phone, my Smythson notebook, umbrella (Melbourne weather is notorious to change every ten minutes), round reading glasses, Ipad, Aesop rinse-free hand wash and ensuring I am dressed appropriately. SJ: What is it like living and working in Melbourne?CK: I have been in Melbourne for nearly four years and it is one of the most wonderful places to live in the world. The city is filled with dynamic, interesting, creative people – you can understand why it is the style capital of Australia. The city provides so much inspiration for me; especially in my work. SJ: What does Melbourne offer that no other city, in your opinion, can offer?CK: Melbourne is constantly rated as one of the world’s most liveable cities. For me it has the best coffee and most interesting selection of restaurants compared to any other city I have travelled to. It’s 45 minutes from a perfect surf beach, 45 minutes from a group of beautiful wineries. An incredible street art/art scene and great sporting events. Any escape you can imagine, Melbourne can provide it. SJ: If someone had 24 hours to spend in Melbourne, what and where would you suggest them to go (eat, shop, visit, sleep)?CK: I would say get up at 6am and walk in the Botanical Gardens, go for an early brunch at Cumulus in the city and then pop to Queen Victoria Market for a quick look, jump in the car for lunch and wine tasting in Yarra Valley. Come back for dinner somewhere in Fitzroy before heading to an art gallery or a walk on Southbank. You really have to have more than 24 hours. Shop: come to see our new Henry Bucks concept store opening in April this year! Stay – The Olsen - Sleep: Don’t. SJ: And finally, since this is The Slowear Journal, could you describe in a few words your idea of a slow lifestyle?CK: Relaxation, travel and having more time with my girlfriend. Taking time to do things well, never rushing. Eating well, drinking well without any stress.

[...]

03.09.2014

Noboby can unveil the slow secrets of a city better than a local. That’s why we decided to launch a series of insider’s slow city guides in the form of short interviews with some of our favourite fashion personalities and professionals. We are thrilled to start with Toby Bateman, Buying Director for Mr Porter [Slowear official online reseller] - a friend, a business partner, and a long-time Londoner. SJ: Please tell us in few words your main passions.TB: Clothes, food, family – not in that order. SJ: Describe yourself in 3 words.TB: Considered, focused, passionate – or I would like to be thought of this way! SJ: You never leave home without… ?TB: Rushing.  SJ: What is it like living and working in London?TB: I lived in central London for 15 years (aged 22-37) and loved it. I had an incredibly wide social circle and would be out almost all the time.  Then we had kids and our priorities changed so we moved out of London – now living in Surrey (actually on a farm) – and I love that too because I escape the pressure of the city each night and at the weekends have lots of space to play with my kids.  I now get the best of both worlds – work in London and live in the country.  SJ: What does London offer that no other city, in your opinion, can offer?TB: It’s a bit of a cliché but you can’t escape the diversity in London - more than any other city I have been to.  The history of the place is also immense - the sense that you are in a city where great and momentous things have happened and will continue to happen…you really get a sense of this in London I think. SJ: If someone had 24 hours to spend in London, what and where would you suggest them to go (eat, shop, visit, sleep)?TB: Shop – I think you’d have to go to a market rather than a fashion store. Borough Market on a Saturday morning is good for food.Eat – St John Restaurant in Farringdon – Fergus Henderson’s “English” restaurant which promotes the concept of “nose to tail” eating.Sleep – it is always difficult to name a hotel in your own town isn’t it?  I’d be better at New York if you asked me!  Instead of recommending a hotel I will recommend that you take a walk along the river heading West after your trip to Borough Market on Saturday morning – all the way to Parliament Sq.  If the sun is shining, which it occasionally does in London, that is a fine thing to do. SJ: And finally, since this is The Slowear Journal, could you describe your idea of a slow lifestyle?TB: I would say it is about managing the pace of your life – taking time to do things well and thoroughly, taking time to consider your actions, taking time to appreciate each day, stopping and taking stock of your life, giving the right amount of time to the things and people that are important in your life.  Do I have a “slow lifestyle”? One day maybe, for now I try to have “slow weekends”!

[...]

10.30.2013

If seasons were to be listed in order of preference, it’s fair to say autumn quite probably wouldn’t  top it. Summer must be everyone’s favourite by far, all about holidays and fun. Winter brings the happiness of Christmas and the magic of snow, and spring the awakening from the deep freeze and a riot of colours. We asked Veronica Crespi, Slow Fashion and Style Consultant and founder at Rewardrobe, to create a moodboard tuned with our AW 13/14 womens collection. According tio Veronica, it’s exactly the colour palette that gives autumn its refinement: warm tones of burnt orange, mustard yellow, amaranth red and chocolate brown mixed with sand and navy bases, to create combinations that convey a classic feel without resorting to the harsher black. Autumn is a season of enveloping warmth – which translates into the softness and textures of fabrics and knits. And with eye-catching prints, that beg to be observed in detail, like a Lucienne Day pattern. And then autumn is a season for the appetite, for tastings, for short trips in search of local delicacies. And as such, intrinsically Slow. What’s not to love? The ideal wardrobe shoud be designed for all the moments that make up these months. For the transition from the intense sun of a sudden Indian summer, to the now dry leaves that get windswept away. From back-to-the-office to the weekend mini-break. Thats the best way to take away the uncertainty of autumn and turn it into an opportunity – it’s no longer ‘what to wear?’, but ‘the perfect time for some layering’. A style more relaxed, more Slowear.

[...]

10.03.2013

Is there anything clumsier than a badly tied tie or a wrongly folded pocket square? Not to mention the wrong strings or an out-of-place bow tie? Style may be innate, but there are still some basics worth learning. So in case you think you might need a quick revision, take a look at The Look Good Series, a brand new web series created by three talted students at Domus Academy in Milan - Polly Crane, Catherine Viriya and Raehan Rauf - who won a student competition launched by Domus Academy and Slowear. The girls shot ten practical video clips to illustrate a step-by-step fresh etiquette of Slow style. Scarves,strings, ties, bow ties, shirts and trousers - no detail is overlooked in this entertaining web series. Enjoy!

[...]

06.26.2013

Only three days left to take part in our short movie competition: June 30 is the deadline for the Slow Tale contest. Over 50 amateur authors are already working with the SlowearStoryMaker tool to turn their idea of slow lifestyle into a story, drawing inspiration from concepts such as attention to details and quality, careful consideration, and respect for those who create and for those who consume. The authors of the three best scripts (according to an international expert jury from Domus Academy, IULM and Naba) will get a complete Slowear outfit, and the winning script will become a professional short movie. The author and his/her friends will also have the chance to act in the movie. No specific professional skills related to scriptwriting are requested - all you need is a deep understanding of the slow lifestyle and the right dose of creativity. 

[...]

04.23.2013

What is slow lifestyle? How do attention to details and quality, careful consideration, and respect for those who create and for those who consume fit into everyday life? Slowear challenges you all to turn your vision of the slow lifestyle into a script that will become a professional short movie. Why a short movie? Because moving image is still the most direct, charming and contemporary language at our disposal. And because most times a few sequences can tell more than a thousand words in terms of ideas and emotions. If you find consumerism obsolete and believe in a slow future, register here and, from May 1st to June 30th, you’ll be able to create your own script online with SlowearStoryMaker -  it’s easy and it’s fun! No specific professional skills related to scriptwriting are requested - all you need is a deep understanding of the slow lifestyle and the right dose of creativity. An international expert jury from Domus Academy, IULM and Naba will select the most interesting script that will then be turned into a professional short movie. Starting from September, the video will be distributed worldwide through our global network. The author and his/her friends will also have the chance to act in the movie.Besides, the three most voted scripts will win a complete Slowear outfit.