11.03.2017

A Weekend at Hokusai’s Beloved Mount Fuji

A World Heritage Site, Mount Fuji is a breath-taking spectacle in every season and a worthy destination for a weekend outdoors, exploring the unexplored.

  • A Weekend at Hokusai’s Beloved Mount Fuji
  • A Weekend at Hokusai’s Beloved Mount Fuji
  • A Weekend at Hokusai’s Beloved Mount Fuji
  • A Weekend at Hokusai’s Beloved Mount Fuji

Mount Fuji is registered as a World Heritage Site and that comes as little surprise. Famed painter Hokusai Katsushika, who was a great influence and inspiration for Impressionist artists, was smitten with Mount Fuji and is in fact known for his depiction of the mountain glaring red in the soft light of a summer morning. Because of the weather condition and – alas – global warming, Mount Fuji can be admired in its redness also at this time of the year. You may be lucky enough to catch “Diamond Fuji”, a phenomenon that occurs when sunset and sunrise align perfectly with the peak of Mount Fuji. You may also see “Red Fuji”, when the snow-capped summit becomes pink in the light of the sun rising or setting. People have been fascinated with the ever-changing beauty of Mount Fuji since time immemorial.
 
In Japan, hatsuyume, the first dream of the year, is thought to foretell the fortune of the dreamer in the ensuing year. Fuji is considered to be the most auspicious dream, followed, for some reason, by the dream of a hawk and the dream of an aubergine.
 
Of course Mount Fuji is a wonderful leaf-viewing destination, but there is always a reason to see Mount Fuji, new aspects to discover and fall in love with.
 
Oshino (Yamanashi Prefecture): Nijū-Magari Tōge
Located at a 1,150m height in Oshino, Yamanashi Prefecture, this pass offers the an absolutely mesmerising scenery with the view of the snow-crowned summit appearing in the midst of the autumnal foliage. Another must-see is Oshino Hakkai, a set of eight ponds fed by snow melted from the slopes of nearby Mount Fuji that filters down the mountain through porous layers of lava for over 20 years, resulting in very clear spring water. The site has been designated as a National Treasure and as one of the Hundred Famous Waters.
 
Fujinomiya (Shizuoka Prefecture): Lake Tanuki
They say Mount Fuji is a whimsical kid, oftentimes not revealing itself because of the adverse weather conditions. However, in Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, the reflection of floating Fuji can be seen on the lake surface, even when it is clouded. Lake Tanuki is a small lake with a 3.3 km circumference and an 8m depth. Mount Fuji is located exactly in the east. In the winter, when the air is clear, the water mirror offers a perfect reflection of Mount Fuji. Additionally, between 20th April and 20th August, excursionist can enjoy the phenomenon of “Diamond Fuji”.
 
Fujinomiya (Shizuoka Prefecture): Asagiri Plateau
Asagiri Plateau is a high plain located west of Mount Fuji, whose elevation ranges from 700 to 1,000 metres. The name Asagiri (lit. “morning haze”) is due to the fact the plateau is foggy in the mornings and evenings from May to August. From the plateau you can admire Mount Fuji in its grandeur, with nothing blocking the view, in a pastoral setting which cannot be found anywhere else.
 
Yamanakako (Yamanashi Prefecture): Lake Yamanaka Panorama
Lake Yamanaka and Mount Fuji are an extremely photogenic combo. In autumn in particular, the foliage around the lake and at the foot of the mountain becomes wine red, which is emphasised by the light of the sunset. From Lake Yamanaka, excursionists can see as far as the Southern Alps. Furthermore, in winter Diamond Fuji is visible for a considerably long period of time.
 
Mount Tsukuba
Surprisingly, very few people know that Mount Tsukuba offers a full view of Mount Fuji. The mountain is located north of Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, in the eastern part of Kantō. It is 877m high and is composed of two peaks, called male and female. From the female peak, you can appreciate the whole view of Mount Fuji in the middle of the Kanto Plain, backed by Tokyo's residential area.
 
 

Author : The Slowear Journal

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Japan  | Mount Fuji  | travels  |

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