01.11.2017

A Glass Story

Murano, the "artisan factory" and how the stories of the objects interwine with those of the people who own them in our interview with Antonio Ceschel, General Manager at Carlo Moretti

  • A Glass Story
  • A Glass Story
  • A Glass Story
  • A Glass Story
  • A Glass Story

It was the year 1958 when Carlo and Giovanni Moretti, having inherited the family business, an artisan company specialized in the production of glasses in Murano, Venice, had the idea of renewing it by combining the traditional know-how of glassmaking masters with their passion for marketing and design.
 
This was the beginning of a story that even today, nearly 60 years later, continues to be told by Carlo Moretti, an "artisan factory" producing objects created by experimenting with shapes and materials, renowned among critics and collectors, hosted in homes as well as in museums, and distinguished by a diamond point engraved signature which makes them unique.
 
Accompanied by a certificate which includes a serial number and basic information on the manufacturing techniques, proving their artisan quality, these objects are produced in limited quantities, mouthblown and hand finished. Yet their crystal-clear personality is also enhanced through the way in which it is presented, promoted and communicated. We spoke about all these themes with Antonio Ceschel, CEO of the company.
 
SJ: What drew you to the Carlo Moretti brand?
AC:
I got to know the brand through a natural evolution of my professional career, yet as soon as my knowledge of the company became deeper I discovered the uniqueness and the passion that distinguishes it at all levels. It is a highly contagious passion.
 
SJ: The rediscovery of artisan brands is a remarkable counterpart to fast consumption. Where does Carlo Moretti stand in this dialectic between craft/niche and mass market production?
AC:
It is not easy to convey all that distinguishes Carlo Moretti, especially to those who have never visited the company. Our flagship stores and the customers who have in some way fallen in love with the brand are the main standard-bearers of our identity. We support communication within the store, with videos and an interactive touch screen monitor available to all the visitors. We believe that all senses should be involved, and this is why we invite our customers to touch our objects: while on the one hand it may slow the spread and growth of the business, on the other hand direct physical interaction with the objects is crucial to establishing a lasting relationship with the brand and to communicate our passion to the public.
 
SJ: The Carlo Moretti objects express a uniqueness that significantly pushes the boundaries of their artisan nature towards the concept of art works. How do you see this relationship?
AC:
Considering ourselves an "artisan factory", we are immersed in a creation process which often solves productive issues with alchemy rather than with science. In our world, design co-exists with glass, a material that literally dominates the space; through the different stages of manufacturing, design becomes a synergic action involving an idea, the skill of the glassmaking masters and the material. Each object lives its own life and it ends up in the hands of the customer as a single piece. We like to think that this uniqueness is linked to the stories of our customers, of their families and of the generations to come. And we like to think that, in a way, all of this is "art".
 
SJ: The story of Carlo Moretti is tied to that of the island of Murano and the tradition of master glass blowers. But through time the island has changed a lot: what is left of authentic Murano?
AC:
The island's history has certainly seen a contraction in terms of brands and companies, yet for a cultured and sensitive visitor the opportunities to visit well-estabished glassmaking companies and attend demonstrations are many and of high quality. Local products are constantly improved in terms of product design and quality, with unchanged respect for the ancient art of glass blowing and the know-how of the masters.
 
SJ: What is your relationship with the city of Venice?
Venice is a city that should be lived to the full, so rich in events, art and culture. Unfortunately, though, I believe that these qualities are not always conveyed in the right way; this is a bit of an Italian attitude – failing to communicate the country’s excellence, especially to the younger generations. This causes a lack of pride and a weakening of our sense of belonging. Yet it suffices to travel a bit around the world to realize how everything that is related to style, quality of life and beauty in general often has an Italian origin. I think even Murano greatly suffers from this lack of communication; its uniqueness and identity have not been promoted as much as they would deserve.
 

Author : The Slowear Journal

related articles | Design & Innovation |